glitter_n_gore: (supernatural pride)
Hi! Happy Bisexuality Week! It’s been a while.

As you may have noticed, I sort of left that Werewolf Pride series hanging. It was meant to end with Ruby and Dorothy from Once Upon a Time as my last post for Pride Month about bisexual werewolves in visual media. No, I’m not picking it up again here. I always meant to, but then the time stretched out and it got awkward and I got busy writing about other things . . . and then there’s the real reason.

I seem to have a mental block when it comes to writing about queer women. Despite or possibly because I am one. I can do it, but it’s agonizingly slow and anxiety-inducing. I’ve also noticed I don’t often like stories about queer women, especially in visual media. There is almost always something about the way the story is told, or the dialog, or the characterization that bothers me. Either I don’t quite see myself in the characters, or I suspect the story is meant for the straight audience members so they can learn a Very Important Lesson about tolerance or something.

Then this happened.


GIF of two women dancing in a crowded 80s club
Source.


And then they give it an Emmy.

Ooooooh baby do ya know what that’s worth? )
glitter_n_gore: (eric draven)
I've been rewatching the first season of Penny Dreadful in preparation for this blog series, and wow, how did I not know Josh Hartnett's "Ethan Chandler" (actually Larry Talbot) was a werewolf from the word Go? Sometimes I'm slow on the uptake. In this case though, I know why I didn't figure it out right away: all the other characters in Penny Dreadful are pulled from classic Gothic literature. The Wolf-Man, however, entered the horror lexicon through cinema.


GIF of full moon rising over the desert as Ethan turns to see it, looking very worried.
Source.


The closest thing we have to a werewolf book is Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and that character is represented elsewhere in the series. So Ethan might technically be the Wolf-Man, and yes his real name is the same as Lon Chaney, Jr.’s character in the Universal film, and good for you if you figured that out before I did. But I've only seen the original Wolf-Man one time, and Josh Hartnett's take on the character is remarkably different from the classic monster in many ways.

There’s blood on my teeth... )
glitter_n_gore: (stoker)
Every so often, you come across a piece of storytelling that creeps into your heart and splits it open with chilly intimacy. I knew very little about I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House before watching it on Netflix, apart from it having the same director as The Blackcoat's Daughter, which came highly recommended. I'm not even sure what compelled me to watch it last week; only I was in bed earlier than usual and wanted something spooky and atmospheric to lull me to sleep.



That did not happen. Oh, it was spooky and atmospheric all right, but I did not sleep soundly. I even had to put the nightlight on. What's most fascinating however is when I started tagging the usual crowd (the Horror fan corner of Twitter, mostly) to gush about it, the first responses ranged from, "Eh, pretty boring," to "I don't remember I fell asleep." Not all of them, and at least one said it got better on the second viewing. Still, this seems to be a movie that you either can't be bothered with; or that understands you so completely it feels almost rude to talk about it above hushed tones.

Read more... )
glitter_n_gore: (emma)
I finally saw it! This weekend! And that was kind of perfect because it was my mom’s birthday, and this is her very favorite Disney movie. One of the first questions I had when I found out this adaptation was happening was: Will it be a musical? The answer is a resounding YES, and I cannot express how gleefully happy this made me.


GIF of Belle and The Beast dancing.
Source.


However, because the 1991 animated feature is one of my favorite movie musicals of all time, I have a slightly different set of criteria when it comes to reviewing it. Usually my priorities fall this way:


  1. Characters.

  2. Setting / atmosphere.

  3. Plot.


In a musical though? Everything falls somewhere after one question: Can they sing?

Tale as old as time... )
glitter_n_gore: (stoker)
aka The Cloverfield Prequel No One Wanted or Asked For. And it somehow turned out even better than the original.



Read more... )
glitter_n_gore: (underworld)

Behold! My Belated Official First Post of 2017!!



I, uh, watched a lot of movies last year. SO for my first official post of 2017, I’m doing a MASSIVE breakdown of the stuff I actually caught in theaters. Also, as you may have noticed, I have moved to DreamWidth! I’m still working on getting all the photos ported over here, so anything that links to Glitter n Gore is going to the LJ account until I get it fixed. Bear with me; I’ll make it work eventually. Meanwhile--movies! Let’s talk about those.

Cross-posted to [personal profile] rhoda_rants.

Capsule reviews below! )

What were some of YOUR favorite movie experiences from 2016?
glitter_n_gore: (leia)
Fellow geeks, it has been a good year for us. This is the sixteenth movie I made an effort to see in theaters in 2016. (I'm going to list the rest of them in a Year End Review post in a couple weeks; watch this space.) However, this year was rough in just about every single other way. I'm not going to talk politics on this blog. Not because I don't have an opinion or don't think it's important, but because I am still struggling to find the right words. If you know me, you don't need me to explain why living in America right now feels like wading through quicksand. But then, when I saw this recut trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, I wept:



After wandering through the 'net chatter elsewhere, I've discovered this wasn't an uncommon reaction. So now, after finally seeing the movie, let's talk about why we all needed Rogue One.

I am one with the Force, and the Force is with me. )
glitter_n_gore: (jean gray)
Earlier this year, there was a special theatrical release of the animated adaptation of the classic Alan Moore graphic novel. It’s a short, controversial volume that includes the closest thing we’ve ever gotten to a Joker origin story. It also codified some of the nastier tropes associated with comics--sexualized violence, fridging, all those awful things we’re trying to get away from by bringing in more diverse writers and content creators instead of leaving the industry as a Boys Club. This is the story in which Barbara Gordon, formerly Batgirl in this particular timeline, gets brutalized and paralyzed from the waist down--all in service of the Joker trying to prove a point. And the way the Joker does this is utterly revolting.

So I’m aware that my feminist street cred will likely plummet when I tell you: it is one of my favorite graphic novels of all time. And this movie is the most perfect version of it we’ll ever see. Let’s talk about why.


Book cover of The Killing Joke; links to GoodReads page


There were these two guys in a lunatic asylum. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (jean gray)
Just got back! I'll try to avoid spoilers. Short version: Loved it! My face hurts from laughing so hard, and I'm sure I missed quite a bit of dialogue for the same reason, so I'm down for seeing it again. Only next time, I'll spring for 3D. There aren't many movies that make me want to spring for 3D. This is one of them.



Less short version here! )
glitter_n_gore: (mia)
So I'm going to see Ghostbusters this weekend. And honestly? While I was somewhere between "Meh" and "Please don't suck" when I first heard of this reboot, the more I hear about it, the more excited I get. I hope I'm not getting my hopes up too much. There are way too many people out there who made up their minds as to whether an all-female Ghostbusters reboot even warranted existing before a single promotional photo hit the 'net. I'm glad my little blog here isn't widespread enough to garner attention beyond the people whose tastes are somewhat similar to mine anyway. Because that's kinda why I write these things: to share my opinion on the thing, and give you an idea of whether it's worth your time as well.

In order to do that, I'm doing a mini-retrospective on the 1984 movie, and then coming back with a review of the new one on Sunday.


"Aim for the flat-top!"


This is what happens when you cross the streams. )

Cross-posted on [livejournal.com profile] rhoda_rants.
glitter_n_gore: (underworld)
As anyone who's known me for a reasonable period of time knows: If there are vampires in it, I have seen it. If I haven't seen it, I at least know it exists, and it is on my list. So it was only a matter of time before Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy came into my life. I've only read the first two so far, but I love them.


Book Cover via Goodreads


As the title suggests, we're in a boarding school for vampires. Not just any vampires, but an elite group of teens separated into the Moroi (full-blooded vamps with magical powers associated with different elements), and the Dhampir (half-human vamps with supernatural strength who act as bodyguards). There's a third group, called Strigoi, who are evil blood-thirsty monsters who no longer resemble the people they once were--basically your more traditional vampires.

In the first book, the main character, Rose Hathaway (Zoey Deutsch) and her best friend Lissa Dragomir (Lucy Fry) have run away from the school. They're tracked down after about a year, but in the meantime a few changes have taken place: Lissa is no longer the popular Queen Bee type at the school, despite being next in line for the throne. A new Dhampir training specialist, Dimitri, has been assigned to whip Rose into shape and keep an eye on her, in case she gets any ideas about running away again. Also, dead animals have begun to turn up at the school--usually just in time for Lissa to find and mysteriously heal them.

Read more. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (jean gray)
Let's see if I can do this without spoilers.

SHORT VERSION: Good times! Fight scenes! Character development! Lots of characters--like, LOTS! Man, this franchise is getting crowded. Didn't feel as overstuffed as it could have though. Everyone has their role, and that's good. Oh, and for the record, I'm Team Captain America. Seeing the movie didn't change that.



Less short version. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (underworld)
Just got back! Trailer!



First things first: This is not a prequel. I thought it was a prequel. It starts prior to Snow White and the Huntsman, when Chris Hemsworth's character (who now has a name--it's Eric!) first gets taken by Queen Freya (Emily Blunt's Ice Queen is called Freya) to train in her army. But then it skips forward like 7 years and it's after Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron's Evil Queen from the first movie) has been defeated by Snow White (Kristen Stewart was not invited back), and supposedly everything is okay now. Until it isn't.

Really it's an expansion of the first movie, an opportunity to explore Eric's relationship with his first love, Sara (Jessica Chastain's definitely-not-inspired-by-Katniss ace archer), and how that all went down before Ravenna's minions picked him up in a tavern all depressed and mopey. It brings in new characters like Freya and Sara who are both a joy to watch, and whose characters arcs are more similar than they realize. The story is a basic quest adventure, with the quest object (the mirror) being the Sealed Evil In a Can variety, and I did enjoy seeing it come into play in the end. But I didn't love it as much as I wanted to. I have two main talking points here. Just two.

Spoilers here. )

*All GIFs via Giphy.
glitter_n_gore: (han solo)
The Invention of Hugo Cabret, both the book by Brian Selznick and the movie (called simply Hugo) directed by Martin Scorcese, is about this kid who lives in the walls of a Paris train station. He keeps all the clocks in the station running, routinely pinches food from the shops to survive, and sometimes clockwork toys from the toy shop for parts. You see, he's trying to repair an automaton--a mechanical man who can write. The automaton is his last connection to his father, who died in a fire at the museum where he worked, and Hugo is sure that when he can get it working, the automaton will give him a message from his father.


Book Cover via GoodReads


Now, in order to get into the real meat of this story, I am going to have to spoil a mid-point plot twist--namely what Hugo actually finds when the automaton comes to life. I went into the movie completely cold and found myself spellbound, and I wouldn't want to rob anyone of that experience if you haven't seen / read it yet. So if you don't want to know any more, this is the place to stop reading.

Read more. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (freddie lounds)
James Dashner's The Maze Runner series has four books, including the prequel that was published last, and movie adaptations for the first two, The Maze Runner and The Scorch Trials. I've seen both, and while I certainly have a lot to say about both, for the purposes of keeping things relatively spoiler-free (and also not testing my blood pressure any more than absolutely necessary) I'm gonna stick with the first one.


Book cover via Goodreads


I don't like them.

Rather, I like the idea of this story, and I rather liked the movie by comparison--which is unusual, as I tend to like the book better than the movie--more than its execution. Certainly there have been worse things to happen to the YA Dystopia sub-genre in the wake of The Hunger Games, but this one bothers me for a very specific reason that I haven't seen in any other YA Dystopia so far.

Read more. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (emma)
Have you heard of the Suck Fairy?

It's a wiley and sadistic little creature who visits all your favorite childhood movies, books, and TV shows, waves a wand, and POOF! Sucks all the magic and charm out of them. This is why when you revisit your favorite things from when you were a kid, you find yourself saying, "I used to think this was so cool, why does it suck now?" Because it's been visited by the Suck Fairy.

At least that was the explanation offered to me on the Internet awhile back. I forget which discussion brought this up. But actually, I'm experiencing sort of the opposite phenomenon now. What's the opposite of the Suck Fairy? A whimsical elf who visits things you didn't like that much on first encountering them, but then when you go back, you go, "Wow, I actually don't remember why I didn't care for this the first time, because it's actually awesome!" Any ideas? The Awesomeness Elf, perhaps?

Let's talk about The Mortal Instruments.


Book cover of City of Bones via Goodreads. Tangent: How gorgeous is that new boxed set? Wow. I'm glad I didn't buy the first editions, because now I can collect the prettier ones!


This best-selling YA urban fantasy series by Cassandra Clare has six books in the main line-up, plus a spin-off prequel series called The Infernal Devices, and most recently a spin-off short story collection called The Bane Chronicles. Since the adaptations so far are focused on the first book, City of Bones, that's mainly what we're talking about today. I have been wanting to love this series since the first book came out. Last week, I finally got it.

Read more. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (jean gray)
A couple weeks ago, the following trailer was released for the upcoming movie adaptation of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children:



Honestly? I think it looks fun. I'm a big fan of reigning Queen of the Goths, Eva Green, and was immediately excited when I heard she'd been cast as the enigmatic Miss Peregrine herself. Also, say what you will about Tim Burton--he knows his audience, and he still has the capacity to create some stunning visuals and memorable characters when he starts with a good story. And this is a good story.

Read more... )
glitter_n_gore: (jean gray)
Damn, this was a good year to be a movie geek. Star Wars! The Avengers! Mad Max! Ex Machina! Crimson Peak! STAR WARS!! I saw a lot of movies in the theater, some of them twice, and I still haven't finished going through the back list. But what was it like for horror fans? Specifically, those of the female persuasion?

The Visit - $65.2 million
Insidious: Chapter 3 - $52.2 million
(Poltergeist - $47.4 million)
(Krampus - $42.7 million)
Unfriended - 32.5 million
Crimson Peak - $31.1 million
(Sinister 2 - 27.7 million)
(The Woman In Black 2: Angel of Death - $26.5 million)
The Lazarus Effect - $25.8 million
Ex Machina - $25.4 million
(Honorable Mention: Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension - $18.3 million)

That's a LOT of movies. Like I said, it was a good year. However you feel about M. Night Shyamalan, or remakes of classics like Poltergeist, or the unflinching cynicism of Christmastime horror-comedies like Krampus, chances are there was something for you to see and love this year no matter what. That's kind of a big deal. Having options is a big deal. Seeing so many movies catering to so many different sensibilities is a big deal. The comparative lack of presence from people of color in this list, regardless of the other good things I just mentioned--also a big deal. Again, there's a reason I decided to do this looking specifically at box office numbers, rather than what I personally thought was the best.

But let's be honest here: this recap is mostly gonna be me gushing about Crimson Peak.


via Tumblr


Read more. )
glitter_n_gore: (stoker)
Happy Leap Day! *phew* Still February. So, I had to get a new computer and lost all my stats so I had to look up these numbers again. I also saw more in theaters this month than I was anticipating, and that helped fill the space nicely I think, but also filled in a lot of blogging time I was expecting to use for other things. So yeah, the wrap-up post for 2015 is gonna get squished into next month. Sorry about that!

Annabelle - $84.3 million
(The Purge: Anarchy - $72 million)
Ouija - $50.9 million
(Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones - $32.5 million)
Oculus - $27.7 million
(Honorable Mention: As Above/So Below - $21.3 million)


The horror universe is Jason Blum's oyster right now. 4 of the 6 movies on this list are Blumhouse productions. If that doesn't convince you he's dominating the genre, I don't know what will. However, even discounting the massive turnout of Blumhouse pictures on this list, there is one that is conspicuous by it's very absence: Jennifer Kent's The Babadook.

Read more. . . )
glitter_n_gore: (mia)
One of the reasons I love watching horror movies, especially in the theater, is that everyone is riveted to the screen. In my experience at least, horror audiences contain the fewest texters, chatterboxes, and rustlings of various foodstuffs. If there is talking, it's of the, "Don't go in there!" variety, or everyone scream-laughing at the jump scares.

But this is the first time I've been in an audience that was utterly silent by the time the credits rolled.


No, really. Do NOT go in there.


Read more. . . )

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